Marin

Overview

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randeis Hillel Day School offers an engaging, integrated and rigorous curriculum that includes a strong foundation in core academic disciplines: English - with an emphasis on writing, reading and public speaking - Hebrew, Spanish (in Middle School) mathematics, science, social studies and Judaic studies.

In addition, art, athletics, drama, music, technology and outdoor education are important components to enhance the development of our students’ hearts, minds and souls. Developing social and emotional skills are an important part of our program as well and play an important part in our school culture.

BHDS has an overall student-teacher ratio of 9:1; our low student to teacher ratio enables each child to reach his or her full potential. Our instructional philosophy reflects standards developed by the State of California, national teachers’ organizations and our own faculty. Brandeis Hillel’s faculty follow the best practices set by experience, a collaborative approach and the most recent findings in educational research.

Academic News

  • Third Grade Develops Community Through Buddy Programs and In-Class Projects

    Posted November 12, 2014

    As part of their yearlong theme of community, third graders have been learning and connecting with the seniors at Drake Terrace. Last week, the third grade class wrote “Bucket” poems with their senior buddies, based on the children’s book Have You Filled Your Bucket? Students were also given a tour of the Drake Terrace facility to see how their buddies live. "The seniors truly enjoy having them visit," says intergenerational coordinator for Bridging Generations Dena Selix. "Residents always look forward to these student interactions especially since many lack contact with this age group."

    This yearlong theme of community permeates the third grade curriculum and guides many of the relationships our third graders cultivate throughout the year. Read on for more...

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  • Eighth Graders Learn about America's Founding

    Posted November 11, 2014

    Eighth graders were asked to write about what they have learned this year in social studies and how their studies relate to our BHDS Core Values. Here is what 8th grader Emily K.-M. wrote:

    "This year in social studies class, we are focusing on the topic of the founding of our country and the struggle for independence. Currently, we’re talking about the Constitution, early quarrels and accomplishments, rebellions, state representation in government, and compromises that led to the forming of the United States of America. It...makes me proud to be an American, and to know that the reason we’re living in this beautiful place today is because of the underdogs who didn’t give up, didn’t lose hope, and didn’t take no for an answer. They fought for us to live in America, and now it’s our job to make it all worth it. This really ties into our school’s core values: integrity, kindness, and service. By being kind, honest, responsible, and helping not just our community, but everywhere else too, we can make the world an even better place and honor those who fought for our country."

    Read on for Emily's remarks in their entirety... MORE PHOTOS

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  • Weaving Teaches Fourth Graders Patience, Focus; Incorporates Native American Studies

    Posted November 11, 2014

    Fourth graders recently began their unit on weaving, an art form that requires focus, discipline, and patience. “It’s a hard skill,” says art teacher Lisa Levy. “It’s a right brain task that can be hard to follow. But if you do it right, the artwork can be turned into something that can be used.”

    In addition to honing their fine motor skills and developing hand eye coordination, this weaving unit incorporates the fourth grade Native American studies; the students are learning firsthand the types of skills the Native Americans needed for creating wonderful, weaving works of art. Another exciting aspect of this project is that they are using recycled materials—leftover fabrics, computer wires, caution tape, bubble wrap, old sheets—on cardboard looms to create everything from bags to monsters. “Weaving really teaches our students the benefit of hard work and patience. You have to wait to the end to see what you’re going to get.” MORE PHOTOS